MAGAZINE

February 7th, 2019
Jesse Gussow

 

The dark, macabre, grunge, and gore artwork by Hannah Burke is difficult to put into one style. It’s a beautiful bleeding of different styles flowing together into some great illustrations. The dark twists on the classic pop culture characters offers an alternate reality where we see what they do when not on tv or magazines. It’s dark and twisted and sick and phenomenal art.

 

 


Where are you from?
I’m from Belleville Ontario, a small (ish) city near Kingston, but I am currently living in Montreal.

 

 

How did you get started on your artistic journey?
I began drawing when I was about 10, often making up my own animals and odd creatures. I continued my artistic journey throughout high school but mainly stuck to photography. Once I started university I began drawing less and less, which made me extremely unhappy. I then realized what I wanted to do with my life so I eventually left university and began creating art, every single day.

 

 

Where do you find inspiration for your work?
I find most of my inspiration from song lyrics/album covers, as well as graphic and gory horror movies, such as Rob Zombie’s horror films. I also get a large amount of inspiration from other artists, such as Francis Bacon and Marina Abramovic.

 

 

How do you want people who view your work to feel?
I used to struggle with how viewers perceived my art, because it isn’t as pretty as people expect art to be. I began to realize that the art and the process that comes along with it, makes me happy and I stopped caring what people thought. But in the end, I want people to make out their own emotions from my art. Whether it’s happiness, sadness, anger, etc. I often get a sense of joy when people are disgusted or upset with my artwork (which happens a lot), because I’m making them feel that emotion with something I’ve created. It’s kind of humorous in my opinion.

 

 

How would you describe your style of art?
I’ve always tried to label my art to a specific style, but it never seemed to fit perfectly in any of the categories. From the top of my head I’d say it’s an “ignorant” style of tattoo flash.

 

 


Your work has a punk grunge lowbrow feel to it. Have you ever done work for bands?
I’ve collaborated with many solo musicians/bands such as: idkcharlie, ropes, new age hip, trei confidence, and soft life

 

 

What’s your favourite colour and dinosaur?
My favourite colour is red, specifically blood red. It’s a distinctive type of red, and is very common in my art. My favourite dinosaur has to be the Majungasaurus, it is one of the only known cannibalistic dinosaurs.

 

 

What’s your process from start to finish?
I don’t have a set process when it comes to my artwork, but oftentimes I will see something that inspires me, and bring it to life through paper. It may take a couple of hours, a few days, or even weeks to finish it. Most artists have to deal with obstacles, such as creative blocks. All I know is that the most important thing in my artistic process is to understand that it is okay to take breaks and let my mind rest for a few days. It can be frustrating when I have a vision and cannot seem to get it through the pen, but I try my best to not let it get to me.

 

 

Do you listen to music while you create? If so what do you like to listen to?
I’m a huge music freak, and listen to all sorts of genres. Depending on my mood, I will listen to different types of artists. Such as, Glenn Miller, a trombonist from the 1940’s, Marilyn Manson, Deftones, and more than any other artist, Electric Wizard; a doom metal band from the U.K.

 

 

What does your artwork say about you?
I feel that each piece I create says something different about me. But in general, most of my art has a gory but feminine side to it. I guess it says that I’m a dark minded but a kind individual, which is true.

 

 

If you weren’t an artist, what job would you have?
I can’t see myself doing anything other than art, but when I was in university I was studying political science and gender studies hoping to be a therapist for youth struggling with LGBTQ related issues.

 

 

Your use of pop culture characters is wicked and gruesome. Where do you get the ideas for those pieces?
My ideas just come from my imagination. When I was in university I learned a lot about political and pop culture figures. I consider myself a humorous person and I just thought it would be somewhat funny to take what I learned in post secondary and mix in blood/gore with pop culture type characters.

 

 

What do you think is the biggest challenge you face as an artist today?
I have a hard time being confident with my work. As with any artist, I always feel like there is room to improve; which there is. I get caught up in comparing myself to other artists and their work. I guess it’s a good thing because it pushes me to work harder, but sometimes it brings me down.

 

 

Do you prefer Oreo or Fudgee-O cookies?
Oreo double stuffed all the way.

 

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